Station 1 and Admin Office

207 E. Allison Road

Cheyenne, WY 82007

Contact Us:

For Emergencies, dial 911

Business Phone:

(307) 632-1696

 

Non Emergent Dispatch Phone:

(307) 637-6525

 

Available for response via the 911 Emergency Dispatch System 24/7.

 

Business hours are from 8AM-5PM Mon-Fri

 

Or you can click here to contact us via email.

Station 2 

6805 Winchester Blvd.

Cheyenne, WY 82007

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Wood Stove Safety

If you're among the thousands who have succumbed to the lure of the wood burning stove, keep in mind that the return to the "good old days" of wood stove heating can have some old-fashioned drawbacks. Fire hazard is one of them. The resurgence of the wood burner as a supplementary source of heat has led to an alarming—and growing—number of fires traceable to careless installation or misuse. The purpose of this pamphlet is to help bridge a generation gap in wood stove knowledge by providing some basic information on the selection, installation, use and maintenance of solid fuel heating equipment. Here are some principal do's and don'ts:

DO—make sure there is enough clearance between the stove and combustible materials, including floors, walls and ceilings.
DO—place the stove on a noncombustible, fire resistant base.
DO—have a mason or other competent person inspect the chimney. 
DO—burn only dry, well-seasoned wood. 
DO—consider opening a window a crack for ventilation.
DO—dispose of ashes in a closed metal container outside the house on a noncumbustable surface

DON’T—extend the stove pipe through a wall or ceiling unless there is no possible alternative.
DON’T—connect a wood stove to a fireplace chimney unless the fireplace has been sealed off.
DON’T—connect a wood stove to a chimney serving another appliance burning other fuels.
DON’T—start a stove fire with flammable fluids, such as gasoline.
DON’T—burn trash in a stove; doing so can start a chimney fire.
DON’T—let a wood fire burn unattended or overnight.

 

YOUR WOOD

Green wood has too high a moisture content for satisfactory use. For your stove select wood preferably hard wood—that has been seasoned six months to a year Wood split before storing to season dries in less time and burns more evenly. Apple, red oak, sugar maple, beech and ironwood have the best heat values, according to the University of Maine Extension Service. Use of the proper wood is your best safeguard against an accumulation of creosote, an oily substance which derives from incomplete combustion, on the lining of the chimney flue. A spark can ignite creosote and cause what can be an extremely hot and dangerous fire.

Dry and well-seasoned wood will not only minimize the chance of creosote formation, but will give you the most efficient fire.

Burning green wood can cause the formation of so much creosote that it may even run down inside the stove pipe and drip onto the stove or floor.

 

IN CASE OF FIRE

If you have a chimney fire, first call the fire department. While you're waiting for the firemen to arrive, you can help control the fire by closing the stove's draft louvers and the solid damper in the stove pipe.

 

ANNUAL CHECKS

Before the heating season each year check and clean your chimney and stove pipe carefully and make any needed repairs. More frequent checks are advisable if you are building up creosote and soot. Unless you are an experienced and competent do-it-yourselfer, think twice before trying to clean your own chimney—you may damage your chimney lining. Rather spend some money on professional service than create a fire hazard that may cost you thousands of dollars or even result in the destruction of your home!

 

 

Gas/Electric Heating

Safety measures:

•Never heat your home with your gas range

• Never burn charcoal inside your home or garage. 

• Always open the chimney flue when you use your fireplace. 

• Never run a combustion engine, such as your car, lawn mower or snow blower, in enclosed areas.

Install a CO detector:

• Install a CO detector within 15’ of any room used for sleeping in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

• Do not install a CO detector near your kitchen or garage or in a room with a furnace.

• If your CO detector goes off and you feel ill, leave the house and call 911 or the local fire department. If you do not feel ill, push your detector's reset button. If the alarm goes off again after a few minutes, open the windows, leave the house and call 911 or the local fire department.

Recognize the symptoms of CO poisoning:

 • Dizziness, nausea, headache and coughing

 • Irregular heartbeat

 • Pale skin with cherry red lips and ear tipsKnow what to do if you suspect CO poisoning:

• Get fresh air and stay outside.

• Call 911 or the local fire department.

 

General tips for supplemental heaters

If your home heating system stops working during a power outage or other emergency, you may need to use a supplemental heater. Or you may be using supplemental heaters to offset your oil use. Safety is critical when using supplemental heaters.

  • Don’t try to heat the whole house. Select a primary room to heat and close off all unnecessary rooms. Supplemental heaters are not intended to replace your home’s central heating system. However, try to make sure that any rooms with water pipes from your home’s plumbing or heating system don’t drop below freezing, or the pipes could freeze and be damaged.

  • Choose a room on the warmer side of the house, away from prevailing winds. Avoid rooms with large windows or uninsulated walls. Your basement may be a warm place in cold weather because the earth acts as insulation and cuts heat loss.

  • If you are using a vented stove or space heater, select a room with a stove or chimney flue to connect the vent to.

  • Read and follow the manufacturer’s operating instructions for your supplemental heating device. A good practice is to read the instructions and warning labels aloud to all members of the household to make sure everyone understands how to operate the heater safely. Keep the owner’s manual at hand.

  • Do not use electric or gas ovens for space heating.

Tips for electric space heaters

  • Do not use electric space heaters in bathrooms or near water unless the unit is specifically designed for wet areas. Corrosion from dampness in the heater could lead to a fire or shock hazard.

  • Keep all space heaters at least three feet away from household combustibles.

  • Do not overload outlets used for electric space heaters. Make sure the outlet you use has the capacity for your particular type of heater. Inspect for cracked, frayed or broken plugs or loose connections before plugging in a space heater.

  • Do not use extension cords with space heaters unless absolutely necessary. If you must use an extension cord, be sure to use a 12-gauge or 14-gauge cord, labeled 12AWG or 14AWG (American Wire Gauge). The gauge number indicates the thickness of the wire in the cord. The smaller the number, the greater the thickness of the wire. Only heavy-duty extension cords should be used with space heaters: do not use a cord marked 16AWG or 18AWG.

  • Inspect the heater cord regularly. Do not use a heater with a damaged cord.

  • Check periodically for a secure plug-to-outlet fit. Feel the plug and the cord: they may feel warm, because heaters draw a lot of power, but they should not feel especially hot. If they do, unplug the heater immediately. If the plug becomes very hot, the outlet may need to be replaced by a licensed electrician.

  • Place the heaters on a flat, level surface. Heaters placed on furniture can fall off, become damaged, or come in contact with combustible material.

  • Look for the UL Mark (the letters “UL” inside a circle) or “U.L. listed” on your electric heater. This means the appliance has met Underwriters Laboratories safety standards.

  • Don’t run electrical cords under rugs or allow them to drape across heaters. Be sure not to place anything on top of a cord, since this could cause the cord to overheat and ignite.

  • Always turn off supplemental heaters when you leave the room or go to sleep.

  • Do not leave a space heater in a room with unsupervised children or pets.

  • Choose and use a space heater with a guard around the heating element. This will help keep children, pets, and clothing away from the heat source.

Make sure the heater has an emergency shutoff that automatically turns off the heater if it tips over. Do not use space heaters to dry clothes, shoes, or boots.

 

 

Tips for portable unvented kerosene heaters

  • Use only heaters that display the UL Mark or “U.L. listed.”

  • Read the manufacturer’s instruction booklet carefully and follow directions for operation and maintenance. Read and heed warning decal messages, typically placed on the back of the heater.

  • Open a window to provide ventilation when a portable kerosene heater is in use.

  • Use only K1 or 1K kerosene, which is a low-sulfur product suitable for unvented kerosene heaters. K1 may also come with a red dye to indicate that it is exempt from excise tax.  Whether is it white or dyed red, it should be crystal clear and free from impurities. Impurities may pose a fire danger.

  • Always refuel the heater outside with the unit off. Do it in an area where small spills can be quickly cleaned up. Avoid carpets or vinyl surfaces. Carpets absorb odor, and vinyl will deteriorate from kerosene spills. Never refuel inside or while the heater is in operation.

  • Place heater away from curtains, drapes, bedding, books, papers, furniture, or other flammable material.

  • Keep children away from the heater.  Do not use it in areas where pets could tip the unit over.

  • Inspect the heater for leaks and excess carbon residue every time you refuel. Clean and maintain it according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

  • Be sure the flame goes out when you turn the heater off.

  • Do not use hairspray or other flammable aerosol sprays, lacquers, or flammable liquids in the area where these heaters are used. Kerosene heaters, as well as gas water heaters, will ignite vaporized fuels.

  • Store kerosene in a tool shed or other outbuilding in an area away from open flames or spark ignition points. Never store kerosene in a home basement.

  • When refueling, do not fill the heater’s fuel tank completely because cold kerosene expands as it warms. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions regarding the length of time the refueled tank should stand at room temperature before the heater is used.

     

  • Use only heaters that display the UL Mark or “U.L. listed.”

  • Read the manufacturer’s instruction booklet carefully and follow directions for operation and maintenance. Read and heed warning decal messages, typically placed on the back of the heater.

  • Open a window to provide ventilation when a portable kerosene heater is in use.

  • Use only K1 or 1K kerosene, which is a low-sulfur product suitable for unvented kerosene heaters. K1 may also come with a red dye to indicate that it is exempt from excise tax.  Whether is it white or dyed red, it should be crystal clear and free from impurities. Impurities may pose a fire danger.

  • Always refuel the heater outside with the unit off. Do it in an area where small spills can be quickly cleaned up. Avoid carpets or vinyl surfaces. Carpets absorb odor, and vinyl will deteriorate from kerosene spills. Never refuel inside or while the heater is in operation.

  • Place heater away from curtains, drapes, bedding, books, papers, furniture, or other flammable material.

  • Keep children away from the heater.  Do not use it in areas where pets could tip the unit over.

  • Inspect the heater for leaks and excess carbon residue every time you refuel. Clean and maintain it according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

  • Be sure the flame goes out when you turn the heater off.

  • Do not use hairspray or other flammable aerosol sprays, lacquers, or flammable liquids in the area where these heaters are used. Kerosene heaters, as well as gas water heaters, will ignite vaporized fuels.

  • Store kerosene in a tool shed or other outbuilding in an area away from open flames or spark ignition points. Never store kerosene in a home basement.

  • When refueling, do not fill the heater’s fuel tank completely because cold kerosene expands as it warms. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions regarding the length of time the refueled tank should stand at room temperature before the heater is used